{"__v":2,"_id":"56a6baa325345621004b7089","category":{"__v":10,"_id":"56a6a012b3ffe00d00156f1e","pages":["56a6a020ef5b2f0d00404364","56a6a303f857190d00c912ed","56a6a5b32ec8310d007bc25c","56a6a81932db8217006c3646","56a6aa8b72faef2100747b07","56a6ae9ccc92d02b00abf3ad","56a6af69f857190d00c912f2","56a6b1d3fc3f8d17001ecda4","56a6b8c4683cfb0d00dc58c3","56a6baa325345621004b7089"],"project":"5511fc8c0c1a08190077f90c","version":"5511fc8d0c1a08190077f90f","sync":{"url":"","isSync":false},"reference":false,"createdAt":"2016-01-25T22:22:10.100Z","from_sync":false,"order":4,"slug":"beekeeping-crash-course","title":"Beekeeping Crash Course"},"project":"5511fc8c0c1a08190077f90c","user":"550b4d5f42c99b2d00e0a68f","version":{"__v":7,"_id":"5511fc8d0c1a08190077f90f","project":"5511fc8c0c1a08190077f90c","createdAt":"2015-03-25T00:08:45.273Z","releaseDate":"2015-03-25T00:08:45.273Z","categories":["5511fc8d0c1a08190077f910","5511fd52c1b13537009f5d31","568ecb0cbeb2700d004717ee","568ecb149ebef90d0087271a","568ecb1cbdb9260d00149d42","56a6a012b3ffe00d00156f1e","56a6bfe37ef6620d00e2f25f"],"is_deprecated":false,"is_hidden":false,"is_beta":false,"is_stable":true,"codename":"","version_clean":"1.0.0","version":"1.0"},"updates":[],"next":{"pages":[],"description":""},"createdAt":"2016-01-26T00:15:31.588Z","link_external":false,"link_url":"","githubsync":"","sync_unique":"","hidden":false,"api":{"results":{"codes":[]},"settings":"","auth":"required","params":[],"url":""},"isReference":false,"order":8,"body":"[block:api-header]\n{\n  \"type\": \"basic\",\n  \"title\": \"The Warré Hive and Beekeeping\"\n}\n[/block]\n##Beekeeping for All\n*by Abbe Warre, Translation by David Heaf ‘as described on Bio-bees forum’*\nThis book describes the development, construction and operation of the ‘People’s Hive’ of Abbé Émile Warré (d. 1951). Responding to the obvious decline in beekeeping in France since his youth, Warré experimented with some three hundred and  fty hives of various designs with the aim of producing a hive that was simple, economical, bee-friendly and assured a surplus for the beekeeper. The resulting ‘People’s Hive’ described in his book L’Apiculture Pour Tous, which ran to twelve editions in French. The full 12th edition translated into english by David Heaf (one of the more prominent modern day users of the the warré hive.)\n\n##Natural Beekeeping with the Warre Hive\n*by David Heaf*\nAuthors Gary Paul Nabhan, a Ph.D. conservation scientist, and Stephen Buchmann, a research associate in ecology & evolutionary biology at Arizona State, are both pollinator enthusiasts. The majority of their research is done in the Sonoran Desert, a surprisingly robust ecosystem. The Forgotten Pollinators set the stage for pollinator conservation awareness within the United States. I highly recommend this book, as it navigates the social and environmental pressures on pollinators as essential ecological partners.\n[block:api-header]\n{\n  \"type\": \"basic\",\n  \"title\": \"Native Pollinators\"\n}\n[/block]\n##Attracting Native Pollinators: The Xerces Society Guide, Protecting North America’s Bees and Butterflies\n*by The Xerces Society and Dr. Marla Spivak*\nPerhaps the best native bee reference available, this book o ers information on native bee identi cation, habitat management, and community involvement. Because the book is written for the common backyard bee-enthusiast, its information is relevant to anyone who works with bees. Supporting bee minded people outside academia, this book aims to integrate native pollinators into human populated areas.\n\n##The Forgotten Pollinators\n*by Stephen L. Buchmann, Gary Paul Nabhan and Paul Mirocha*\nAuthors Gary Paul Nabhan, a Ph.D. conservation scientist, and Stephen Buchmann, a research associate in ecology & evolutionary biology at Arizona State, are both pollinator enthusiasts. The majority of their research is done in the Sonoran Desert, a surprisingly robust ecosystem. The Forgotten Pollinators set the stage for pollinator conservation awareness within the United States. I highly recommend this book, as it navigates the social and environmental pressures on pollinators as essential ecological partners.\n\n##Keeping the Bees: Why All Bees Are at Risk and What We Can Do to Save Them\n*by Laurence Packer*\nLaurence Packer is a researcher and professor at York University. In his book he introduces\nhis favorite bees and their roles in ecosystems and agriculture. The latter part of his book focuses on contemporary conservation concerns for the bees and the connected impact on human populations. Packer uses academic research of his own, but also that of many other contemporary melittologists (those whose academic study focuses on wild bees) throughout his book. It is one of the only full length contemporary publications on the topic of wild bees.\n[block:api-header]\n{\n  \"type\": \"basic\",\n  \"title\": \"Honeybees\"\n}\n[/block]\n##The Beekeeper’s Handbook, Third Edition\n*by Alphonse Avitabile, Diana Sammataro and Roger A. Morse*\nA good beekeeping book is hard to  nd. The Beekeeper’s Handbook is a reliable text for beginning and advanced beekeepers. As your practice grows this book can stay with you, as there is always more detailed information to explore.\n\n##The Barefoot Beekeeper\n*by P. J. Chandler*\nPhil Chandler is an outspoken Top Bar beekeeper from the UK. His work challenges traditional beekeeping methods, seeking holistic approaches to keeping bees within today’s economic and agricultural realities that tend to de ne apiculture. His book The Barefoot Beekeeper is written for beekeepers with a general knowledge about honeybees. It is one of the only beekeeping books that focuses on Top Bar beekeeping, teaching the beekeeper to draw upon a grounded knowledge of bees beyond a list of seasonal instructions.\n\n##Clan Apis\n*by Jay Hosler*\nThis comic book depicts the evolution of bees and the daily life within a honeybee colony. This unique source o ers an accessible account of the basics about honeybees. The visual characterization of honeybees explains often foreign and complex phenomenon within the hive, like swarming, in a joyful and accessible fashion.\n\n##Honeybee Democracy\n*by Thomas D. Seeley*\nHoneybee Democracy is an exciting report on Tom Seeley’s in-depth research on swarming. His research details the process of swarming, how a swarm chooses and  nds a new home, and how they get there. A window into the magic of honeybee colonies, this book will inspire and enlighten anyone who finds intrigue inside a honeybee hive.","excerpt":"","slug":"further-reading","type":"basic","title":"Further Reading"}
[block:api-header] { "type": "basic", "title": "The Warré Hive and Beekeeping" } [/block] ##Beekeeping for All *by Abbe Warre, Translation by David Heaf ‘as described on Bio-bees forum’* This book describes the development, construction and operation of the ‘People’s Hive’ of Abbé Émile Warré (d. 1951). Responding to the obvious decline in beekeeping in France since his youth, Warré experimented with some three hundred and fty hives of various designs with the aim of producing a hive that was simple, economical, bee-friendly and assured a surplus for the beekeeper. The resulting ‘People’s Hive’ described in his book L’Apiculture Pour Tous, which ran to twelve editions in French. The full 12th edition translated into english by David Heaf (one of the more prominent modern day users of the the warré hive.) ##Natural Beekeeping with the Warre Hive *by David Heaf* Authors Gary Paul Nabhan, a Ph.D. conservation scientist, and Stephen Buchmann, a research associate in ecology & evolutionary biology at Arizona State, are both pollinator enthusiasts. The majority of their research is done in the Sonoran Desert, a surprisingly robust ecosystem. The Forgotten Pollinators set the stage for pollinator conservation awareness within the United States. I highly recommend this book, as it navigates the social and environmental pressures on pollinators as essential ecological partners. [block:api-header] { "type": "basic", "title": "Native Pollinators" } [/block] ##Attracting Native Pollinators: The Xerces Society Guide, Protecting North America’s Bees and Butterflies *by The Xerces Society and Dr. Marla Spivak* Perhaps the best native bee reference available, this book o ers information on native bee identi cation, habitat management, and community involvement. Because the book is written for the common backyard bee-enthusiast, its information is relevant to anyone who works with bees. Supporting bee minded people outside academia, this book aims to integrate native pollinators into human populated areas. ##The Forgotten Pollinators *by Stephen L. Buchmann, Gary Paul Nabhan and Paul Mirocha* Authors Gary Paul Nabhan, a Ph.D. conservation scientist, and Stephen Buchmann, a research associate in ecology & evolutionary biology at Arizona State, are both pollinator enthusiasts. The majority of their research is done in the Sonoran Desert, a surprisingly robust ecosystem. The Forgotten Pollinators set the stage for pollinator conservation awareness within the United States. I highly recommend this book, as it navigates the social and environmental pressures on pollinators as essential ecological partners. ##Keeping the Bees: Why All Bees Are at Risk and What We Can Do to Save Them *by Laurence Packer* Laurence Packer is a researcher and professor at York University. In his book he introduces his favorite bees and their roles in ecosystems and agriculture. The latter part of his book focuses on contemporary conservation concerns for the bees and the connected impact on human populations. Packer uses academic research of his own, but also that of many other contemporary melittologists (those whose academic study focuses on wild bees) throughout his book. It is one of the only full length contemporary publications on the topic of wild bees. [block:api-header] { "type": "basic", "title": "Honeybees" } [/block] ##The Beekeeper’s Handbook, Third Edition *by Alphonse Avitabile, Diana Sammataro and Roger A. Morse* A good beekeeping book is hard to nd. The Beekeeper’s Handbook is a reliable text for beginning and advanced beekeepers. As your practice grows this book can stay with you, as there is always more detailed information to explore. ##The Barefoot Beekeeper *by P. J. Chandler* Phil Chandler is an outspoken Top Bar beekeeper from the UK. His work challenges traditional beekeeping methods, seeking holistic approaches to keeping bees within today’s economic and agricultural realities that tend to de ne apiculture. His book The Barefoot Beekeeper is written for beekeepers with a general knowledge about honeybees. It is one of the only beekeeping books that focuses on Top Bar beekeeping, teaching the beekeeper to draw upon a grounded knowledge of bees beyond a list of seasonal instructions. ##Clan Apis *by Jay Hosler* This comic book depicts the evolution of bees and the daily life within a honeybee colony. This unique source o ers an accessible account of the basics about honeybees. The visual characterization of honeybees explains often foreign and complex phenomenon within the hive, like swarming, in a joyful and accessible fashion. ##Honeybee Democracy *by Thomas D. Seeley* Honeybee Democracy is an exciting report on Tom Seeley’s in-depth research on swarming. His research details the process of swarming, how a swarm chooses and nds a new home, and how they get there. A window into the magic of honeybee colonies, this book will inspire and enlighten anyone who finds intrigue inside a honeybee hive.